Reel pride

What to see (or skip) as the huge Frameline 38 LGBT film festival takes over the city

|
()
Run for it: 'Futuro Beach'
COURTESY OF FRAMELINE

The Case Against 8 (Ben Cotner and Ryan White, US) This documentary follows the successful fight to have Proposition 8 overturned as unconstitutional and restore legality to gay marriage in California. There's way too much time spent on the couples chosen as plaintiffs, a Berkeley lesbian pair and two Los Angeles male partners — we get it, they're nice people — and the decisions to disallow broadcast of the eventual court proceedings means we get laborious recitations of what people have already said on record. Frameline has shown so many documentaries about gay marriage already that festival regulars may find this one covers too much familiar ground at excessive length. (It also doesn't bother giving much screentime to the anti-gay forces, which might have livened things up a bit.) Still, it's a duly inspirational tale, with real entertainment value whenever the focus turns to the case's very unlikely chief lawyers: mild-mannered Ted Olson and boisterous David Boies, the latter a longtime leading conservative attorney who'd argued the other side against Olson in the Bush v. Gore presidential election decision. Nonetheless, he's all for marriage equality, and these otherwise widely separated figures are great fun to watch as they work, taking considerable pleasure in each other's company. Thu/19, 7pm, Castro. (Dennis Harvey)

Bad Hair (Mariana Rondón, Venezuela, US) Living in a Caracas tenement, Marta (Samantha Castillo) has no husband, no romance in her life, and now no job after she's fired from a security company. She turns her frustrations on the older of her two fatherless children, 10-year-old Junior (Samuel Lange Zambrano), whose insistence on straightening his hair like the people he sees on TV strikes her as incipiently gay — and that is something she is not willing to tolerate. Mariana Rondón's prize-winning feature is a small, subtle drama about the poisoning effects of economic pressure and homophobia within the family unit. It's also quietly devastating about something you don't often see in movies: The real-world truth that, sometimes, deep down, parents really don't love their children. Sat/21, 1:30pm, Roxie. (Harvey)

Floating Skyscrapers (Tomasz Wasilewski, Poland, 2013) Competitive swimmer Kuba (Mateusz Banasiuk) has moved girlfriend Sylwia (Marta Nieradkiewicz) into the Warsaw apartment he shares with his possessive divorced mother (Katarzyna Herman), but the two women don't get along and Kuba doesn't seem very committed to the relationship anyway. So Sylwia immediately worries her days are numbered when Kuba — who already indulges in the occasional furtive public gay sex — shows unusual interest in out Michal (Bartosz Gelner). As the two young men grow closer, it becomes clear that this is something neither of the women in Kuba's life will stand for. Tomasz Wasilewski's Polish drama has a crisp widescreen look and a minimalist air, with little dialogue articulating emotions the characters are wrestling with. Though its protagonist isn't particularly likable, the film's simultaneous confidence and ambivalence lends its eventually depressing progress real punch. Sat/21, 9:30pm, Victoria; June 26, 9:30pm, Roxie. (Harvey)

Related articles

  • Hot and cool

    Love story 'Blue is the Warmest Color' courts acclaim — and controversy

  • Elm Street state of mind

    FRAMELINE 2013: Gay horror icon Mark Patton revisits 'Nightmare 2'

  • More to grow on

    FRAMELINE 2013: Short takes and highlights from Frameline37